Finally, an Official Diagnosis for Sexual Compulsivity! – Robert Weiss LCSW, CSAT-S

  For a long time, sexually addicted/compulsive people did not have an official diagnosis delineating the criteria for diagnosing and treating their disorder. Nor could they get insurance companies to directly fund much-needed treatment for this debilitating issue. This did not by any stretch of the imagination mean that sexual addiction/compulsivity did not exist, because it did. (For a comparison, think about alcoholism, which was officially recognized by most medical and psychological organizations as a diagnosable and treatable disorder in the 1970s. But that hardly means the issue did not exist prior to that time.) The good news is that the World Health Organization (WHO) has announced that the latest version of its diagnostic manual, The International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11), will include “Compulsive Sexual Behaviour Disorder” as an official diagnosis. For those who are not familiar with this manual, I’ll simply state that it’s the most commonly used medical… Continue reading

This One Thing Could Change Your Life -Jeanne Foot 

  The opposite of addiction is not sobriety. The opposite of addiction is connection.” – Johann Hari As humans we are wired for comfort and will recoil from any discomfort which is why Addiction is such a pervasive disorder and is hard to treat.  In fact, it happens to have a very poor recovery rate compared to other chronic conditions. When life feels like it is giving out more than our share of what we can handle, it may not seem surprising that we will do anything to distract ourselves from the uncomfortable feelings that will steadily rise to the surface, until it is virtually impossible not to self sooth in ways that we have grown accustomed to. It may start with having that drink you know will deliver that ‘oh so good’ feeling that you have been chasing all day.  It may be more subliminal like a creative project such… Continue reading

Detox My Socks Off – Mark Masserant

  An unforgettable week on pins and needles unfolded while I waited for a bed in a Detox unit after my last drunk, but I rode it out. Things at my house were a little brittle. The treatment center I went to was filled to capacity, so I was returned home after my evaluation until space became available. They gave me a heartfelt ‘Hang in there!’ and a handshake to go, along with a fistful of pamphlets. My wife didn’t say a word. ‘Just my luck,’ I thought as I wandered off into the darkness of the night and my life. “We’re so sorry—it shouldn’t be long. Four or five days at the most,” they assured me. Still, it was no sure thing I’d make it back once I hit the bricks. “Remember– call if you need help,” they offered, but that was unlikely—I knew me. What’s worse, they forgot to… Continue reading

Addressing Emotional Abuse in Addiction Recovery – By Lee Weber

  There are people who try to control other people’s actions by behaving in an abusive way. Often, the abuse manifests through humiliation, fear, guilt or feeling of embarrassment. So, how can we deal with current or past emotional abuse in recovery? We explore the issue here. Then, we invite your questions ro feedback at the end. What Is Emotional Abuse, Exactly? Emotional abuse is defined as is the ongoing emotional maltreatment or emotional neglect of a child or person. It is mostly expressed verbally by: critisizing disapproval of another person’s action(s), or constant expression of dissatisfaction This type of behavior, especially when it appears in primary relationships with loved ones, can destabilize self-confidence and sense of self-worth. Emotionally abused individuals see no way out, experience a growing fear of being alone, and ususally tend to accept the abusive situations and behaviors as normal. But, how can you recognize if… Continue reading

Whether or Not Our Loved One Finds Recovery – Jackie Stein

Loving someone who has a problem with drugs or alcohol is life changing for the entire family.  Those of us who have been down this road know that we have spent huge chunks of time and energy trying to help and/or fix our loved one.  We can become obsessive.  In fact, our loved one can become OUR addiction.  We feel a wide range of emotions – mostly fear and anxiety, but sometimes also anger at what the disease is doing to our loved one and in fact, to the whole family.  We worry ourselves to the point of becoming physically ill.  In many cases, we make little or no time to take care of ourselves. At some point most of us figure out that without help, nothing will change in the family.  There are no guarantees that our loved ones will find recovery.  They might go in and out of… Continue reading