Detox My Socks Off – Mark Masserant

  An unforgettable week on pins and needles unfolded while I waited for a bed in a Detox unit after my last drunk, but I rode it out. Things at my house were a little brittle. The treatment center I went to was filled to capacity, so I was returned home after my evaluation until space became available. They gave me a heartfelt ‘Hang in there!’ and a handshake to go, along with a fistful of pamphlets. My wife didn’t say a word. ‘Just my luck,’ I thought as I wandered off into the darkness of the night and my life. “We’re so sorry—it shouldn’t be long. Four or five days at the most,” they assured me. Still, it was no sure thing I’d make it back once I hit the bricks. “Remember– call if you need help,” they offered, but that was unlikely—I knew me. What’s worse, they forgot to… Continue reading

Addressing Emotional Abuse in Addiction Recovery – By Lee Weber

  There are people who try to control other people’s actions by behaving in an abusive way. Often, the abuse manifests through humiliation, fear, guilt or feeling of embarrassment. So, how can we deal with current or past emotional abuse in recovery? We explore the issue here. Then, we invite your questions ro feedback at the end. What Is Emotional Abuse, Exactly? Emotional abuse is defined as is the ongoing emotional maltreatment or emotional neglect of a child or person. It is mostly expressed verbally by: critisizing disapproval of another person’s action(s), or constant expression of dissatisfaction This type of behavior, especially when it appears in primary relationships with loved ones, can destabilize self-confidence and sense of self-worth. Emotionally abused individuals see no way out, experience a growing fear of being alone, and ususally tend to accept the abusive situations and behaviors as normal. But, how can you recognize if… Continue reading

Whether or Not Our Loved One Finds Recovery – Jackie Stein

Loving someone who has a problem with drugs or alcohol is life changing for the entire family.  Those of us who have been down this road know that we have spent huge chunks of time and energy trying to help and/or fix our loved one.  We can become obsessive.  In fact, our loved one can become OUR addiction.  We feel a wide range of emotions – mostly fear and anxiety, but sometimes also anger at what the disease is doing to our loved one and in fact, to the whole family.  We worry ourselves to the point of becoming physically ill.  In many cases, we make little or no time to take care of ourselves. At some point most of us figure out that without help, nothing will change in the family.  There are no guarantees that our loved ones will find recovery.  They might go in and out of… Continue reading

Recovery as an Act of Resistance – By William L. White

When a slave was drunk, the slave holder had no fear that he would plan an insurrection; no fear that he would escape to the north. It was the sober, thinking slave who was dangerous, and needed the vigilance of his master to keep him a slave. –Frederick Douglass, 1855.  Addiction is influenced by personal vulnerability, but global drug trends and their consequences to individuals and families are also influenced by larger technological, political, economic, and cultural processes. Awareness of such contextual influences and their relationship to personal recovery has been most fully articulated within American communities of color and other historically oppressed and marginalized communities. The earliest recovery support movements in North America rose within Indian tribes whose prophetic leaders (e.g., Handsome Lake, Tenskwatawa, Kennekuk) expressed a profound understanding of the role alcohol was playing as a weapon of exploitation, colonization, and extermination. These leaders challenged the “Firewater Myths” that portrayed racial… Continue reading

“Body Hacks” For Long Term Recovery – By Kyczy Hawk

Body Hacks for Long Term Recovery: why it is so hard to be in the moment and tools to help you find NOW. Why do I feel like something is about to happen; all the time? I feel in a state of high alert, not as if something good is going to happen, but the “other shoe is going to drop” and the first shoe wasn’t that great. I scan for danger- not just the regular amount of be aware of your surroundings but an extreme sense of predicting disaster. My hypervigilance is not just about my own safety but for the potential discomfort and lack of safety for others. I want to make everything “all right” for everyone, and that means looking out for them and remaining ever vigilant. Why is my stomach on the verge of upset so much of the time? Indigestion, even bouts of nausea and… Continue reading