Christine Beck
Christine Beck is a writer and college teacher. She is a published poet of works such as “Blinding Light,” and “Stirred, not Shaken.” She works with writers in 12-step recovery in regular workshops called Recovery Writers. Sober for 12 years in AA and a member of Al Anon as well as Adult Children of Alcoholics, she believes alcoholism is a family disease and that writing our stories is an important tool in recovery. Her website is www.ChristineBeck.net.

Eight Daily Practices for Recovery – by Christine Beck

I believe that alcoholism is a family disease.  My father was an alcoholic, one of those unfortunates who never found recovery and died destitute and homeless at the age of 50.  I swore I’d never become an alcoholic, but at the age of 50 myself, my two glasses of wine had become 4 or 5 and I wanted to “cut back.” I tried. I couldn’t.  I also swore I’d never marry an alcoholic, but I did.  When I found the Laundry List of Adult Children of Alcoholics (ACA), I learned adult children marry alcoholics or become alcoholic.  That’s what we do.  Not “bad or wrong;” it just “comes with the package.” So today I need three twelve-step programs to keep me sober and sane. At the risk of being over-simplistic, I can summarize the three programs this way.  AA taught me that alcohol was not my “problem.” It was my… Continue reading

Flash to Bang – By Christine Beck

“No! Are you fucking crazy?  Put that down, right now! You’ll blow us both to kingdom come!” I couldn’t believe what I saw: my husband reaching up to the chandelier above our dining table, oil can in hand, getting ready to pour oil on lighted candles.  I imagined the coming firestorm. How could he be so stupid? He froze, turned to me and in that instant, I could see that he was not about to be challenged.  The hatred in his eyes was fierce, as if I was the enemy back in Vietnam. I fled.  Ran down the front hallway and started up the stairs, glass of wine in hand, miraculously not spilled.  He caught up with me in an instant, grabbed my arm. “Don’t you walk away from me!” Normally, I’d try to placate him, calm him down, minimize the issue.  How important was it after all? Nobody got… Continue reading