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About Jamie Marich

Dr. Jamie Marich's friends and colleagues describe her as a renaissance woman. A dancer, musician, performer, writer, recovery ambassador, clinical counselor, and Reiki Master Teacher, Marich unites these elements of her experience to achieve an ultimate mission: bringing the art and joy of healing to others. Marich began her career in human services working in humanitarian aid in Bosnia-Hercegovina from 2000-2003. She travels internationally speaking on topics related to EMDR, trauma, addiction, and mindfulness while maintaining a private practice (Mindful Ohio) in her home base of Warren, OH where she operate an EMDRIA-approved basic training program in EMDR Therapy. She is the developer of the Dancing Mindfulness practice and regularly trains facilitators to take this unique practice into both clinical and community settings. Jamie Marich is the author of EMDR Made Simple: 4 Approaches for Using EMDR with Every Client (2011), Trauma and the Twelve Steps: A Complete Guide for Recovery Enhancement (2012), and Trauma Made Simple: Competencies in Assessment, Treatment, and Working with Survivors. Her new book, Dancing Mindfulness: A Creative Path to Healing and Transformation is scheduled for release in 2015 with Skylight Paths Publishing. Marich is a certified rational living hypnotherapist and completed the Street Yoga trauma-informed yoga teacher training program. She is also a Certified Yoga of 12-Step Recovery (Y12SR) leader.

Please Don’t Tell Me “I’m In A Safe Place” – By Jamie Marich Ph.D., LPCC-S, LICDC-CS, REAT, RMT

We’ve all heard it—from yoga teachers, from therapists, from ministers, from other holistic practitioners: “You’re in a safe place.” Many guided meditations directly write this line into the scripts with the intention of setting a tone for safety and security. The LGBT and other socially progressive movements also like to make use of phrases like safe space or safe zone to alert people that (in theory) they won’t be judged in a particular venue. Therapists and 12-step sponsors I’ve talked to over the years insist on the value of this line. The general argument is that if people coming for services have no conceptualization of what safety means, they must be instructed as to what is a safe place, a safe person, or a safe experience. They must be reminded that the danger of the past is indeed passed. I call foul. Whenever I’ve been told, as a survivor of… Continue reading

Politics, Resentments, and Lovingkindness – By Jamie Marich, Ph.D., LPCC-S, LICDC-CS, REAT, RMT

I am full of resentments this election cycle in the U.S. I resent the candidate whose way of being in the world triggers all of my trauma issues down to their deepest core. I resent the loyal masses of followers voting for said candidate, including family and friends who belong to this group. I resent the lies and twisted misinformation being spread around as Gospel truth and I resent that the country I love so much has created a climate for this phenomenon to even happen. I also resent members of my own political party—people who, directly or indirectly, are chiding me for not being a stronger supporter of our own party’s candidate. As a citizen, I have a right to see who I am voting for as a lesser of two evils, yet expressing sentiments of this nature has often led to complete invalidation of my feelings. As social… Continue reading

When Crusty Oldtimers Talk Smack about InTheRooms – By Jamie Marich, Ph.D., LPCC-S, LICDC-CS, REAT, RMT

As is often the case when I newly meet others in recovery, a recent conversation with a new friend I got to know through professional circles turned to topics like the Recovery 2.0 Conference, Tommy Rosen, Nikki Myers and Yoga of 12 Step Recovery. Eventually InTheRooms (ITR) came up because Tommy and Nikki’s work is featured regularly on ITR. “Have you done any meetings on ITR?,” I asked joyfully? “Oh no,” he answered with an air of smugness and superiority, “I still do my meetings live.” Something about his tone and the curtness of his response elicited quite a visceral reaction within me. In fairness to my new friend, his response may not have intended to carry any judgment; it could have just been his sharing of experience, strength, and hope. I know that my reaction was so strong because his response is representative of something about old guard recovery… Continue reading

Welcome to Trauma and the Tweleve Steps: A New Meeting (And Movement) on InTheRooms.com

Hello everyone! My name is Jamie Marich, and I am a woman in long-term recovery from alcohol, drugs, co-dependency, compulsive overeating, and work. I am also a survivor of trauma. When I set out on a path of recovery fourteen years ago, I had the privilege of being twelfth stepped by Janet, a wonderful woman with over twenty five years of recovery who really got trauma. She understood that if she tried to take me through the steps in a rigid, fundamentalist manner, I would not stay in the rooms. Not only did she help me realize that so many of my addictive responses were intertwined with traumatic reactions, she guided me through my first two years of recovery in a compassionate way. I am now a dually licensed mental health and addiction counselor specializing in trauma, and I have the awesome privilege of traveling the country to train others in… Continue reading