Spiritual Bypass V Acting Yourself into Right Thinking – Kyczy Hawk

How can I tell if I am growing by acting gown up or practicing spiritual bypass? What is the difference between walking the talk, acting myself into right thinking, and finding a more socially acceptable delusion to the practice of my addiction? When does “go-along to get-along” become toxic? What if I weren’t always “nice”? Why do I feel like a fraud? Why do I only want you to see my spiritually enhanced self without ever seeing the dark, unpleasant or unlovely parts? How can I tell I am avoiding growth and how can I tell I am actually participating in a form of spiritual bypass? First a definition: “. . . [we] use spiritual ideas and practices to sidestep or avoid facing unresolved emotional issues, psychological wounds, and unfinished developmental tasks.”  – John Wellwood, psychologist and Buddhist practitioner. As in all things recovery oriented; that sentence makes it sound… Continue reading

The History of Addiction Recovery in America – William L White

Two of the most significant milestones in the history of recovery are the increased self-recognition of individuals in recovery as a distinct “people” and the tandem emergence of an ecumenical (beyond identification with a particular mutual aid group or treatment institution) culture of recovery. The former is being expressed through a grassroots recovery advocacy movement celebrating multiple pathways of recovery, and the latter is reflected in the construction of recovery-focused history, values, language, literature, symbols, rituals, art, film, and theatre, as well as through the emergence of new recovery-focused social institutions (e.g., recovery residences, recovery high schools and collegiate recovery programs, recovery-friendly workplaces, recovery ministries, recovery cafes, etc.). This brief essay highlights a growing historical consciousness within this emerging culture of recovery. Retrieving, preserving, and disseminating the history of addiction recovery is far more than an academic exercise. It is the medium through which each generation passes on collective experience… Continue reading

B Is for Balance – By Andrea Wachter, LMFT

We live in such a fast-paced culture with such high expectations that it’s no wonder so many people are struggling to find balance. I often ask clients in my psychotherapy practice to take a realistic look at their schedules and see what can be deleted, shortened, or shifted, and we laugh at the irony of them having to find the time to even look! It’s an art, this “finding balance” thing… Not too busy, not too idle. Not too full, not too empty. The good news is: We don’t have to do it perfectly, and a little change can make a big difference. I find myself more and more frequently working with people who are overworked, overstressed, overly unhappy, and overly medicated. When I dive into the reality of their day-to-day schedules and expectations, their distress makes perfect sense. Students who are overburdened by demanding class schedules, homework assignments, and… Continue reading

3 Social Benefits of Recovering from Alcoholism – Mary Lamphere

If you’ve ever turned to alcohol with hopes of becoming more outgoing and social, you’re not alone. Many who struggle with alcohol abuse started drinking in the first place due to feeling shy, awkward, or anxious in social settings. But what many don’t realize is that quitting drinking can actually improve your social life, and repair relationships that may have suffered on behalf of alcoholism. Nobody should have to quit drinking on their own without help and support, including you. Recovery is a long and rewarding process with many benefits along the way. Here are three social benefits associated with quitting drinking and overcoming alcohol addiction. 1. Gain Total Control of Your Actions Intoxication can make you say and do things you normally wouldn’t do when sober. In most cases, drinking can lower your inhibitions and influence you to engage in negative, destructive behaviors. For instance, you might say hurtful… Continue reading

What is your Vision Plan for Recovery as an Adult Child of an Alcoholic? – Christine Beck

Adult Children of Alcoholics’ first promise states that “We will discover our real identities [our True Self] by loving and accepting ourselves.” Many of the other promises contain qualities that our True Self will attain, such as being playful and fun or learning how to be both vulnerable and intimate. These and other program promises sound wonderful, but how do we attain them? For me, the answer is much more than going to meetings and working the steps.  I need to carry program principles into specific actions in every area of my life, including my work, family and relationships. And I need to write down action steps, to keep myself accountable. I looked at my life and wrote a personal vision statement for how to become my True Self in ACA, but also at home, with family and friends and with the work I do in the world: I will… Continue reading