How is Your Dependence Serving You? Unlocking Your Truth – Nicola O’Hanlon

Addiction and dependence have many definitions. There are many different opinions and many heated arguments around the subject. For me there is no one clear definition for each person regarding their dependence or addiction. Humans are too complicated and their circumstances too individual to stick a generic prescription on what looks like a similar dis-ease. This is what fits my personal experience; Addiction or dependence is the act of relying on or being controlled by someone or something else to keep me functional. You can define your own experience how you want to. When we think of addiction or dependence, most of us will immediately turn to things like drugs or alcohol to identify the concept. Some of us are or have been addicted to these substances and now see ourselves as alcoholics or addicts. Of course, we know that addiction or dependence covers a vast arena of substances and… Continue reading

3 Social Benefits of Recovering from Alcoholism – Mary Lamphere

If you’ve ever turned to alcohol with hopes of becoming more outgoing and social, you’re not alone. Many who struggle with alcohol abuse started drinking in the first place due to feeling shy, awkward, or anxious in social settings. But what many don’t realize is that quitting drinking can actually improve your social life, and repair relationships that may have suffered on behalf of alcoholism. Nobody should have to quit drinking on their own without help and support, including you. Recovery is a long and rewarding process with many benefits along the way. Here are three social benefits associated with quitting drinking and overcoming alcohol addiction. 1. Gain Total Control of Your Actions Intoxication can make you say and do things you normally wouldn’t do when sober. In most cases, drinking can lower your inhibitions and influence you to engage in negative, destructive behaviors. For instance, you might say hurtful… Continue reading

The Leroys–A Recovery Parody – by Mark Masserant

With the final days of the winter of 2015 approaching and extreme boredom setting in, the Pink Elephant Group decided it was time for something new. Already in the books were several Bowl-a-thons, Karaoke Nights, and finally, the fly-by-night Velcro Twister Games, which led to random thirteenth steps and oodles of resentments.  We dropped them like a bad habit. Pin-the-Tail-on-the-Drunkard was proposed, knocked around and hastily shot down unanimously—our butts had fallen off long ago, leaving most of us disqualified. After multiple suggestions were scrapped, Bitter Bill spoke up from the back of the room. “How’s about handing out some awards to a bunch of ex-drunks?  ‘Course, I probably won’t get one,” he droned drearily. With the Oscars on the horizon, we decided he was right—we could host an awards ceremony, with our own peculiar spin to it. It immediately wobbled into our Pink Elephant think tank. After much debate,… Continue reading

How Life Gets Better When You’re Sober – By Rob Tropp

If you are in early recovery, you may be struggling to find your way as a sober person. You may be wondering what your life will be like without drugs and alcohol. You may feel some apprehension and awkwardness. While early recovery is not without its share of obstacles, you will begin to realize how much better your life will be clean and sober. So how is your life better sober? You Look Better An obvious benefit of sobriety is that you look better. Once the toxins leave your body, your body will return to normal. The blemishes you may have will clear up, and the dark circles under your eyes will become minimized. You will start to look and feel younger, and you will become happier and gain more confidence in yourself. Better Relationships Drug addiction is marked by manipulation and lies, and many of your relationships with those… Continue reading

Yogic Tools for Recovery: A Guide to Working the 12 Steps – A Review by Erika Duffy

Many of our human brains excel at separating, dissecting, labeling, categorizing and organizing concepts in an attempt to make them more understandable, yet terribly complicated. This author has, in her genius, taken incredibly complex, timeless wisdom and historically successful methodologies for healing and made them simple(not easy), comprehensible and accessible. Over the years I have wrestled, like many people, to regulate my personal fluctuations between my attachments to pleasure and my aversion to pain settling on a “healthier addiction” to collecting books or knowledge. In constant pursuit to quell my endless thirst for the most up to date, accurate resources for my own personal growth and to assist my offerings to students and residents I work with countless books lining multiple shelves, desks, tables and even the floor alongside my bed. For the past twelve years I have been a facilitator of yoga and meditation in schools, camps, studios and… Continue reading