Natural Therapies to Treat Depression – Nicola O’Hanlon

Depression is described as a mood disorder that causes a persistent feeling of sadness and loss of interest. That simplistic explanation doesn’t really cover it though. My own experience of depression has, at times, left me completely dysfunctional and unable to perform the smallest task. It can and has in my case, lasted for weeks, months and even years. I’ve done extensive research on the causes and cures. I’ve had many treatments since I was 15 years old for depression and anxiety, but never found one thing that has made it disappear. Well, alcohol and drugs did a pretty good job for a while. But then there’s that whole dependence issue and ruining your life – so that had to stop. The one thing I’m sure of, having explored every avenue of wellness for myself, is that chemicals of any kind, illegal or prescribed do not work for me. I’ve… Continue reading

Yoga to Combat Depression – Kyczy Hawk

““Yoga gives us an active role in healing. And by slowing down mental chatter through breath work, it helps facilitate self-acceptance,”  – Yoga International What a lovely promise. Depression hurts so much it would be wonderful for there to be a simple answer to healing and avoiding it. Simple but not easy is what we learn in the rooms of recovery. Self-care and self-acceptance sound straight forward, but the effort is overwhelming if you start the process when you are deep in depression. A key is practice. Three actions to help with depression: Practice self-care for prevention Return to self-care before an emotional “emergency” Use three forms – so you can have them to choose from (anytime and anywhere) Breath Meditation Hatha – pose or asana practice Addiction and a familiarity with depression often go hand in hand. Some say addiction is a process of “self-medication” for symptoms of anxiety,… Continue reading

The Breath Is The Bridge

Right now, before you start reading, take a moment to breathe, with attention, three or four times.  These deep breaths come from a soft abdomen and an expandable chest. In and out through the nose – or in the nose and out the mouth.  Not to be too concerned about a “right way”.  Just breathe. Become aware of where you are sitting, how your body feels then close your eyes and breathe. Welcome back! How do you feel now? A slow deep breath resets the nervous system, calming the mind and the body.  A shallow breath can signal stress or alert the brain and body to impending danger.  Consciously utilizing the breath to a slower deeper pace can signal your system that you are safe. What does breathing have to do with recovery? Everything.  A shallow breath, a clenched chest and heart, an adrenaline infused system is reactive.  In my… Continue reading