Speaking vs. Stuffing Your Truth – By Andrea Wachter, LMFT

Most of us do not easily speak our truth. Our behavior is determined by years of conditioning. We are told, “Be nice and polite,” and “Don’t hurt anyone’s feelings.” We may be so bogged down with shoulds and shouldn’ts that we find it hard to identfy our true feelings and needs, much less respectfully and responsibly communicate them to others. There are basically four options when it comes to speaking vs. stuffing your truth: Option number one is to stuff our truth down — also known as passivity, and this can potentially lead to problems with substance abuse and/or feelings of depression. Option number two is to blast our truth out — also known as aggression. This can be seen as violence, yelling, road rage, or even being sarcastic or mean. Option three is a combo plate, which is known as passive-aggressive. It might seemkind, but it is really aggressive. For… Continue reading

” minding midnight ” – Nikki Marie Rink

many, Many moons ago stood a forest- Dark & Dense. within the Tall & Looming trees, wandered the Keeper of Loneliness.   among Countless ill-lit paths alongside many menacing streams the Keeper spun & spun in circles, hopelessly searching for Lost Dreams.   one by one- the branches broke. the leaves danced to the ground. the sunlight revealed a quiet clearing- Where her Soul was found. Continue reading

Recovery Revolution (Ten Historic Milestones) – William L White

Critics have claimed that recovery advocacy, recovery management, recovery-oriented systems of care, and related ideas and initiatives are a “flavor of the month” fad and that the so-called “recovery revolution” is nothing more than new words for what the addictions field has been doing for decades. Such shallow criticism ignores fundamental changes that are unfolding that will profoundly influence the future of addiction recovery—and the future of addiction treatment as a social institution.  I recently posted an outline detailing these changes in ten critical areas: 1) International growth and diversification of secular, spiritual, and religious recovery mutual aid organizations, 2) Exponential growth of virtual recovery communities and online recovery support resources, 3) Birth and maturation of a new recovery advocacy movement, 4) Emergence of an ecumenical (beyond identification with a particular mutual aid society or treatment institution) culture of recovery, 5) Rise of new recovery support institutions, 6) New recovery support roles/services as… Continue reading

Less Pushing More Allowing – Nicola O’Hanlon

I’d like us to think about that concept for a moment and consider what it means. We so often that we much push for what we want, work harder and faster, put all our effort into out goals until we have nothing left to give. But is that really the best way to achieve what we want? Let’s do a short visualization to help us connect with what Less Pushing and More Allowing means to you. It may be different for each person. Sit comfortably in your chair. Feel your feet flat on the floor, back against the chair, shoulders relaxed. Close your eyes if it feels comfortable for you. Take a deep breath in through your nose until your lungs are filled to capacity, hold…….and let go out through your mouth. Do this breathing exercise three times. Now I want you to become very aware of yourself, and when I… Continue reading

The Tangled Labyrinth of a Chaotic Childhood – Kyczy Hawk

I have not felt as if I had any connection with my ancestors; but it turns out that I do. Not in the “descended from royalty” kind, or the “long line of heroes” type, but the “inherited a poor resilience structure” kind. I do have a history, and it is painful. After several years in recovery I had to look at my life before liquor, my childhood before cocaine, my minority before marijuana – you get the drift. There were behaviors and characteristics that had set the stage for my using, drinking, rampant sexuality, dependence on independence. I had to untangle my old solution set, and find a new structure for my character and inner self, just as I had found recovery for my disease of addiction. This had to start in my past. With a family that moved often between cultures but had no center in itself, this wonderful… Continue reading