LIFE OR DEATH AFTER A NON-FATAL DRUG OVERDOSE By William L White

Drug overdose deaths in the United States have risen exponentially due to sequenced drug surges: 1) prescription opioids, 2) heroin, 3) illicit fentanyl and related analogs, and 4) cocaine and methamphetamine—all used alone or in combination with other drugs. More than 66,000American lives lost each year to drug overdose have sparked numerous initiatives ranging from increased naloxone availability and medically-supervised injection sites to expansion of addiction treatment resources. The personal stories behind overdose death statistics have helped stir public and professional alarm, but less attention has been given to the question, “What is the subsequent fate of the larger number of people who experience a non-fatal drug overdose?” Research studies (see Stoové et al, 2009) have long associated surviving a drug overdose with the increased likelihood of a future non-fatal or fatal drug overdose. In a 2017 Massachusetts study of opioid overdoses, 10% of those who survived died within the next year from a drug… Continue reading

A little of my 12 Steps

A little of my STEP 1: once I start using, I can’t stop or control my using. Using controls me. As a result, my life becomes garbage. I’m totally focused on getting & using my substance of choice, coming down when I can’t get more, scheming and planning how to get more – but more is never enough. A little of my STEP 2: Sitting in a meeting of people like myself while I was still detoxing, I came to believe these other people found a way out, a way to live and function without drugs/alcohol. If I believed in them, then I could get the same results. A little of my STEP 3: This is a very big step for me. I felt I was on a precipice. Keeping my will and my life solely in my care meant I would again get high. Back to step 1. Back… Continue reading

My Love Story – Yoga & Recovery

What it used to be like, what happened and what it is like now is the traditional framework for sharing at a meeting. This progression holds true for both my recovery and my yoga practice. At one point my life was consumed by suffering which eventually became overwhelming. I had a life changing experience and chose a different path. Let me give you some of the details of my journey. I was what is termed as a garbage girl ­ I used anything and everything. I used chemical substances including alcohol in combination, I used alone, I used them with other people – I’d take anything, anywhere, anytime. I exhausted my internal resources to cope with that lifestyle. About the same time I ran out of other resources too: money, friends, family, work, health and the will to live. Having hit my lowest point, somehow I managed to have a… Continue reading

Why I Choose To Stay Sober & Sane – By Jeanne Foot

After the alcohol and drugs are gone, what’s next? The path of recovery, followed closely with the gifts of sobriety may seem like a hard sell at first. I remember that very day, when I was being asked to choose between the comforts and certainty of active addiction, or choose the great uncertainty of recovery. The foremost thought racing in through my mind at this crossroad of my life, was whether I was one of those people who could live without drugs and alcohol. I was being asked to give up my elixir of life and to find another way. This is all I have ever known! What is the other way? I, like many, had my fair share of unfortunate circumstances. Somehow, I did not get the memo about ‘normal people’ not living their life this way. For me there was ever enough alcohol. Life was one continuous party,… Continue reading

The Hardest Thing I Have Had To Do – By Kyczy Hawk

I quit drinking, That was hard; it was imperative, it was time, I had hit bottom. It was still hard. I quit taking drugs. Again, it was crucial; it was life saving, and it was hard. Working the steps: hard. Living life on life’s terms: hard. Learning to do things clean and sober for the first time: dating, dancing, sex, getting jobs, quitting jobs, applying to school quitting jobs, raising the kids: hard, hard, hard. Further into recovery I was able to discern the source of some of my “defects” and “shortcomings”; rooted as they were in my primary issues of attachment to others and suppression of myself. I wanted so much to be approved of, to be part of, that I repressed some of my native characteristics. I had to investigate my addiction to what I call “otheration”(living through what I thought were the eyes of others), adapting myself… Continue reading