• Past Articles

Recovery Month Awareness for the Families of Loved Ones Affected by Substance Use By Jackie Stein, BALM® Family Recovery Life Coach

    Many of you know that I have spent the last couple of years studying to be both an addiction counselor and also a BALM® Family Recovery Life Coach. Counseling gives me the opportunity to work with others who are struggling to maintain recovery as well as learning to live life on life’s terms in early recovery. Be A Loving Mirror (BALM®) is a program that teaches families how to be their loved one’s best chance at recovery and how to avoid being their loved one’s best chance at relapse. I would like to tell you a bit more about BALM®, how I came to be a family member and how that has brought me full circle to studying to be a certified Family Recovery Life Coach. I first came to the BALM® program as the partner of a loved one struggling to get and maintain recovery.  I was… Continue reading

Podcast with Jodee Prouse, Author of The Sun Is Gone

Jodee Prouse is a speaker, blogger and author of the powerful memoir The Sun is Gone: A Sister Lost in Secrets, Shame, and Addiction and How I Broke Free. She is an outspoken advocate to eliminate the shame and stigma surrounding Addiction and Mental illness as well as empowering women to survive life’s challenge’s and family crisis. Jodee has two adult sons and has been married to her husband Jim for 27 years. They share their time between Sylvan Lake, Alberta and their cottage in Oroville, Washington. I talked to Jodee Prouse recently about her deeply intimate book, The Sun Is Gone. Everyone in the world should read this book. It’s a story of family and the consequences of addiction for all it’s members. It is raw and honest and brave, but full of compassion and empathy. Jodee and I spoke the day after she had to put her beloved dog to sleep, so… Continue reading

One Of Millions – By Regina Walker

It is the eve of the anniversary of my sister’s suicide, and I am watching a 12-minute video Irish performer Sinead O’Connor posted on her Facebook wall. In it she is tearful, saying that she is suicidal and alone. She is both pleading for help, and chastising those who she believes should be helping her (“my children, why is it acceptable that your mother lives in a fucking Travelodge?”). O’Connor describes herself as “one of millions” who are suffering from mental illness and the stigma that goes with it, and who have been abandoned because of it. In the video, she speaks directly to her family a number of times, and asks why they are afraid of her. “I am 5’4”. I sent angry emails but how can you be afraid of me?” I remember the soulful eyes that were so mesmerizing in O’Connor’s video for her song Nothing Compares… Continue reading

Children of Alcoholics and Addicts ARE Victims But They are NOT Helpless or Hopeless – By Jackie Stein

  The International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression is a United Nations observation which occurs each June 4th. Created in August of 1982, the commemoration originally concentrated on child victims of the 1982 Lebanon War; however, its objective has been enlarged to recognize the trauma borne by children who are the victims of physical, mental and emotional abuse. It is time to recognize that children of those addicted to alcohol and other substances are innocent victims who suffer a great deal of physical, mental and emotional abuse but they can and do survive. Pardon the pun, but the National Association for Children of Alcoholics1 notes the following sobering points that speak to the gravity of this crisis. More than 28 million Americans are children of alcoholics; of those, nearly 11 million are younger than age 18. Children exposed prenatally to illicit drugs are two to three times more likely to be… Continue reading

When You’re in recovery but they’re not – By Patty Powers

The following post is based on a series of conversations that keep popping up lately. I use a masculine pronoun but this story is not gender specific. Perhaps this blog will hit home for some people new to recovery. To be clear, the situation I’m describing involves having a partner who’s a casual consumer of substances – not someone heavily dependent or in the grips of their own addiction. You did it. You’re finally clean and sober. What an achievement! Maybe you’ve even been exercising, hitting some yoga classes, and spending as much time as you can with your new sober friends. In fact, the only thing that feels shitty is going home to your partner. Driving home you find yourself praying his car won’t be in the driveway. Sometimes just the thought of him unleashes a flood of negative feelings you swallow down. You walk into the house and… Continue reading