Staying Sober When Your Friend’s Aren’t – Isabella Paola

When I was in college my friends and I liked to party, which I always thought was normal until it wasn’t. Two weeks before my graduation I entered a drug treatment center. I think I was lucky to be able to get professional help. I also think I was lucky because I got to take a little vacation away from my friends, stress at school, and family issues I created. I learned a lot in the four weeks I spent there, one of the things I remember the most was “people, places and things,” and “rescue risks recovery.” If I’m being honest, I didn’t think either of these things applied or mattered to me, most of my friends weren’t going to be asking me to get high with them on the weekends, that was always me. Plus, a decent amount of my friends didn’t do drugs and were what I… Continue reading

YOUR RECOVERY QUOTIENT? TOWARD RECOVERY FLUENCY – By William L White

In 2012, I experimented with the creation of a recovery knowledge exam (See What is Your Recovery Quotient? Toward Recovery-focused Education of Addiction Professionals and Recovery Support Specialists). The 100-item test was intended to illustrate the training emphasis on drug trends, psychopharmacology, and addiction-related pathologies in marked contrast to the scant attention paid to the prevalence, pathways, styles, and stages of long-term addiction recovery. (For details on such limited attention, click HERE) We live in a world where people experiencing significant alcohol and other drug (AOD) problems call upon diverse iconic historical and contemporary figures, catalytic ideas, words, slogans, metaphors, and quite varied identity and story styles to resolve these problems. The challenge for addiction treatment and recovery community organizations and their service providers is to create environments and service menus within which all of these organizing motifs and languages are available. Achieving such broad recovery fluency among addiction treatment and recovery… Continue reading

Enjoying a Beauty Boost during Addiction Recovery

If you are in recovery from alcohol and substance abuse, then one area that could fast become a priority, is rebuilding healthy, glowing skin. Alcohol and drugs can dehydrate skin and interfere with the natural process of collagen formation. They can cause skin to become dull, lose its firmness, and develop wrinkles and lines. Your scalp and hair can be affected to; if you haven’t been following a healthy diet, you may find your hair is dry and brittle, or that it is thinning. There are many ways to turn back the hands of time and give yourself a pampering treat. What sounds more up your street? A relaxing facial at your favorite spa or a new cute and style at the salon?  Starting with the Right Skincare Visit a dermatologist if you have a skin condition such as rosacea, or even excessive dryness. They may recommend specific treatments and they will point… Continue reading

Addiction Recovery Boosted by Quality Sleep – By Jackie

Addiction Recovery Boosted by Quality Sleep Adequate sleep is of great importance to our overall health and wellbeing. Unfortunately, nearly a third of Americans are affected by sleep-related problems according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. While there are numerous lifestyle changes such as those involving diet and exercise that need to be made in order to facilitate recovery effectively, one of the most important is often overlooked: sleep. By simply getting more quality sleep, you can give your recovery a tremendous boost, helping you kick your addiction to the curb for good. The connection between sleep and substance abuse Sleep and substance abuse often have a very complicated relationship. Individuals living with addiction have a five times higher chance to also experience ensuing sleeping disorders according to research conducted at the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Florida College of Medicine. Many addicts turn to sleep aids to help… Continue reading

Variation in Recovery Identity Adoption – By William L. White

A significant portion of people who resolve alcohol and other drug (AOD) problems do not embrace a recovery identity—do not see themselves as recovered, recovering, or in recovery. I first suggested this in Pathways from the Culture of Addiction to the Culture Recovery (1990) and later in a co-authored essay on the varieties of recovery experience (White & Kurtz, 2006), but had nothing but years of observation and anecdotal stories to support it. When I was asked about the prevalence of adoption or non-adoption of a recovery identity among people who had resolved AOD problems, no data were available to inform that question. Thanks to a just-published study by Dr. John Kelly and colleagues of the Recovery Research Institute, there is now data that addresses that and related questions. The Kelly-led research team surveyed a representative U.S. population sample of people who had resolved a significant AOD problem during their lifetime and determined the extent to which such individuals adopted… Continue reading